5 Reasons Living on Campus in a Residence Hall is a Great Idea

With a move-in date this September, Shoreline Community College’s brand new residence hall could be the best place for Shoreline students who want to engage with their campus, their classmates, and have a traditional U.S. college experience!

Here are 5 reasons why living on campus when you come to study at Shoreline is a great idea.

You’ll be part of a community

When you live in a residence hall on campus, staff work to help create a sense of community among the students living there by planning and hosting events and activities like movie nights and video game tournaments in cozy common areas like the one above. You’ll meet lots of new people and make friends that you’ll have for life. The people I met in my residence hall are still some of my best friends today!

Staff will be there to support you

Our residence hall will have a full-time Director who will live in the hall. Additionally, there will be four student Resident Assistants living in the hall to help you with anything you need. If you’re feeling homesick, you’re adjusting to your new life as a college student in the U.S., or you just want to meet new people, you’ll always be able to talk to the Resident Assistants!

There will also be 24-hour security in case of emergencies.

Students who live on campus do better academically

Researchers have found that students who live on campus tend to get higher scores in their classes than other students. They also show more development, gain greater interpersonal self-esteem, and generally report having a better experience with their undergraduate education!

Lots of amenities for residents

Because our residence hall is brand new, all the rooms are beautifully finished. Plus, they already have tables, beds, chairs, and all the other furniture you’ll need, so you won’t have to worry about buying any!

Students who live there will also have kitchens with modern appliances that will make even people who don’t know how to cook want to learn! There will also be a shuttle that runs from the residence hall to nearby supermarkets, so if you don’t want to drive or walk, you can just hop on the shuttle to get your shopping done. Residents will also have access to free, secure Wi-Fi. Water, electricity, and gas are also provided at no extra cost.

You’ll be right on campus!

If you enjoy having a slow, peaceful morning, or if you don’t like waking up early, living on campus is the best! It will take you 10 minutes or less to walk to your classroom, and you won’t have to worry about driving or taking the bus every day. And between classes, it will be very easy for you to go home if you want to do some cooking, have your own space to relax, or take a nap! Shoreline’s campus is also, as you can see above, a beautiful, green, and relaxing environment. It’s the perfect place to live!

Of course, these are just some of the great things about living on campus. Rooms are filling up quickly, so be sure to apply to live in our residence hall as soon as you can! You can apply at our residence hall’s website.

How a Shoreline Student Got Thousands of Dollars to Study Abroad

Growing up in Yakima and working on his uncle’s fruit farm, Logan Gamache did not think that he would one day travel to Cape Town, South Africa. Logan said, “I definitely would not have the opportunity to go without Shoreline.”

Logan Gamache photo by Rylan Good

This summer, Logan, along with other students and faculty from Shoreline, will do just that. They will study issues of social justice, equity, and communications, as well as learning about local history and culture. He is able to do this thanks to a $2,500 scholarship he received to help pay for the program.

Logan attended an information session on the program with Dr. Ernest Johnson, who is leading the South Africa program along with Dr. Elena Esquibel. At the session, Dr. Johnson shared a list of scholarships for studying abroad. Logan found out that, because he receives a Pell Grant, he was eligible to apply for the U.S. Department of State’s Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship, which awards scholarships of up to $5,000 to help students pay for study abroad programs.

Cape Town, with Table Mountain in the background

After writing a couple of essays and a few months of waiting, Logan was notified that he would be receiving a $2,500 scholarship. He was the only student from a two-year college in Washington State to receive funding from the Gilman Scholarship for this application cycle.

So far, Logan has only traveled to Canada and Mexico. The farthest he’s ever flown is from Florida to Washington, which takes less than six hours. To get to Cape Town, he’ll be taking two back-to-back flights of more than ten hours each. He’s excited to explore a place so far away and so different from home.

Aside from the academic portion of the program, which Logan believes will be useful in the travel and tech industries he hopes to work in, he is looking forward to climbing the iconic Table Mountain and seeing breathtaking views of Cape Town.

As a player on Shoreline’s men’s soccer team, he will unfortunately have to miss a significant part of next year’s season, but this study abroad program funded almost entirely by scholarships is “a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity,” according to Logan, and couldn’t be passed up.

Since 2012, sixteen Shoreline students have received the Gilman Scholarship. In recent years, even though this is a very prestigious scholarship, about 50% of Shoreline students who have applied have received funding. If you or someone you know wants to learn more about studying abroad and scholarships, contact Cory Anthony in the International Education department at canthony@shoreline.edu or stop by his office in PUB 9302.

Welcome New Students!

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Last week, Shoreline Community College welcomed new international students!

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The new students come from fifteen different countries, including Peru, Cambodia, Venezuela, the Philippines, and Kuwait! They had many opportunities to get to know each other and Shoreline Community College during orientation, like competing in a scavenger hunt that took them throughout campus.

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On Friday they went with the International Peer Mentors on a tour of the University of Washington and sightseeing in downtown Seattle. It was the perfect weather, and the students enjoyed a taste of summer in Seattle.

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Please welcome them and help make Shoreline Community College feel like a home away from home!

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– Text by Meg Humphrey, photos by 204 Photographers and Yushin Wung

This Weekend: Cherry Blossom & Japanese Cultural Festival

The Seattle Cherry Blossom & Japanese Cultural Festival is an outstanding event that has been in Seattle’s history for over 40 years! The event is completely free and takes place in Seattle Center in the outdoor Fisher Pavilion and inside the Armory. It spans three days: Friday, April 21st through Sunday, April 23rd.

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The festival has many events planned throughout the weekend including many music and martial arts demonstrations, storytelling, and tea ceremony (chado). Every day has a good mix of performances, so if you can’t make it one day, you won’t miss anything!

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You can wander through exhibits featuring flower arranging (ikebana), kimono, kite making, calligraphy, sword polishing, Yoroi armor, and more! There is something for everyone to enjoy at the festival. For more details, you can check out their official website here.

– Meg Humphrey
Photos by Joe Mabel (GDFL or CC-BY-SA-3.0), via Wikimedia Commons

Engage in Change with Earth Week

Learn more about what you can do to protect nature during Shoreline Community College’s Earth Week! Earth Week is four full days of discussions, demonstrations, activities, and performances to help educate everyone about the importance of taking care of the world around us.

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For full times and details, please visit the Earth Week Events Calendar. Below are some highlights!

Wednesday: April 19

  • Sustainable actions through solidarity
    • Arbor Day Recognition/Tree Campus USA Certification
    • Keynote Address: Worldview of a Standing Rock Sioux: Tribal member Kyle Schierbeck, Coyote Follows the Road
    • Exhibit on Standing Rock and the Flint Water Crisis
    • LIVE Music Performance: Jared Bridge

Thursday, April 20

  • Community Sustainable Actions
    • Supporting a vibrant Seattle through urban forestry policy: Urban Forestry Policy Advisor – Sandra Pinto de Bader
    • Green City Partnership: Restoration for Enhancing Ecology & Community – Matt Mega
    • Discussion: The 3E’s of Sustainability: Finding the “SWEET Spot”
    • Deep Roots Garden Veggie Start Giveaway
    • Washington Native Plants Society
    • Mushroom Growing Kits
    • LIVE Music Performance: Funk & Groove

Friday, April 21

  • Engage in Change: Taking Action
    • Participatory Volunteer Action: Campus-wide fruiting ivy removal. Ridding our campus of invasive plants one species at a time. Participants MUST SIGN UP in the Student Leadership Center by Friday, April 14!
    • LIVE Music Performance: Ukulele Club

Saturday, April 22

  • Spring Ecological Restoration
    • All participants are welcome to join us for our annual Earth Day restoration event in the North Woods at Shoreline Community College. We will be removing invasive plants including ivy, laurel, holly, and blackberries. We will be planting a variety of native ground covers, shrubs, and trees. Gloves and tools will be provided, but if you have your own please bring them. Wear close-toed shoes or boots, layers of clothes, a rain coat if needed, and a hat. Bring water! Participants will meet at the parking lot east of the soccer field.

Shoreline Welcomes Students from 30 Countries

Fall quarter’s International Student Orientation Program is always the biggest of the year. This year, it was also among the most diverse groups of students we have ever welcomed to Shoreline, with arrivals from 30 countries across five continents.

To all of our new students: We are excited to see the contributions you will make to campus, and we wish you a wonderful start to your academic careers here at Shoreline. If you ever need any help, support, or even if you are just looking for opportunities to get involved, come in and see us in the International Education offices.

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“From Peril to Hope: Migration and Refugees” – NIEA Fall Workshop at Shoreline Community College!

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Every year, NIEA (Northwest International Education Association) sponsors a one-day conference for college faculty and staff to learn about current global issues and world events.  The theme of the conference builds on the Community College Master Teacher Institute organized by the Center for Global Studies of UW Jackson School of International Studies.

This year, the fall workshop theme is “From Peril to Hope: Migration and Refugees”. It will be held at Shoreline Community College on October 23rd, 2015.

WORKSHOP HIGHLIGHTS

  • Develop a deepened understanding of human migration, refugee and immigration issues.
  • Learn innovate approaches for integrating above themes into curricula and campus.
  • Hear reports from the 2015 Community College Master Teaching Institute.
  • Learn how faculty in different fields are utilizing NIEA mini grants to internationalize curriculum, and how you can apply for a mini-grant to infuse global perspectives into your courses.
  • Explore options for studying abroad, related experiences, and best practices.
  • Engage in lively discussions with colleagues from diverse disciplines across Washington state, and share innovative approaches to incorporate above themes into curricula and campus.

KEYNOTE ADDRESS

“Safe Haven in the Storm?: Understanding the European Immigration Crisis”

Dr. David Fenner, Affiliate Faculty at the Jackson School of International Studies.

At a time of unprecedented mass migration from the countries of the Middle East, Africa and Eastern Europe – and the expanding humanitarian crisis as desperate migrants seek any means possible to reach Western Europe, we shall explore the historical, political and economic roots of human migration in general and these unfolding human events in particular.  In addition, participants will learn about a number of web-based tools designed specifically with student research projects in mind.

SESSIONS AT A GLANCE

What’s Old is New Again:  The Recurring and Elusive History of Washington as An Immigrant Border State.

Session Presenter: Valerie F. Hunt. faculty member in the bachelor’s degree program of Applied Behavioral Science at Seattle Central College.

In order to teach and develop curricula about immigrant and refugee issues, it is important to understand some of the structural, historical, political, and social contexts of immigration in general, and Washington State in particular. In this workshop, participants will examine Washington’s history as a border state and what it means to be a border state, especially compared to other U.S. border states.

We will also review key dimensions of immigration—labor market forces, state/society relationships, human and civil rights—and how these dimensions inform our perceptions and practices about issues such illegal immigration,  “anchor babies,” job and education funding competition between native-born and immigrant workers, and national identity. The workshop will provide participants with leading-edge, state-of-the-discipline concepts, themes, and language to use when developing their own immigration-focused curricula.

Additional Sessions:

  • Cultural Influences and Contributions of Immigrants
  • 2015 Community College Master Teaching Institute on Immigration and Refugees: Content and teaching applications.
  • Immigrants, refugees and undocumented students: Highlighting experiences and diversity on campus, in the classroom, and community.
  • Teaching Abroad: Best Practices and Options for Teaching Abroad
  • Integrating Global Perspectives into Teaching through NIEA mini grants.

The Workshop is especially significant in light of current conditions, and is sponsored by Northwest International Education Association (NIEA) and Center for Global Studies at University of Washington.  Registration is via the NIEA website www.nieawa.org, then send payment to Heather F. Lukashin as indicated on the form.