“From Peril to Hope: Migration and Refugees” – NIEA Fall Workshop at Shoreline Community College!

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Every year, NIEA (Northwest International Education Association) sponsors a one-day conference for college faculty and staff to learn about current global issues and world events.  The theme of the conference builds on the Community College Master Teacher Institute organized by the Center for Global Studies of UW Jackson School of International Studies.

This year, the fall workshop theme is “From Peril to Hope: Migration and Refugees”. It will be held at Shoreline Community College on October 23rd, 2015.

WORKSHOP HIGHLIGHTS

  • Develop a deepened understanding of human migration, refugee and immigration issues.
  • Learn innovate approaches for integrating above themes into curricula and campus.
  • Hear reports from the 2015 Community College Master Teaching Institute.
  • Learn how faculty in different fields are utilizing NIEA mini grants to internationalize curriculum, and how you can apply for a mini-grant to infuse global perspectives into your courses.
  • Explore options for studying abroad, related experiences, and best practices.
  • Engage in lively discussions with colleagues from diverse disciplines across Washington state, and share innovative approaches to incorporate above themes into curricula and campus.

KEYNOTE ADDRESS

“Safe Haven in the Storm?: Understanding the European Immigration Crisis”

Dr. David Fenner, Affiliate Faculty at the Jackson School of International Studies.

At a time of unprecedented mass migration from the countries of the Middle East, Africa and Eastern Europe – and the expanding humanitarian crisis as desperate migrants seek any means possible to reach Western Europe, we shall explore the historical, political and economic roots of human migration in general and these unfolding human events in particular.  In addition, participants will learn about a number of web-based tools designed specifically with student research projects in mind.

SESSIONS AT A GLANCE

What’s Old is New Again:  The Recurring and Elusive History of Washington as An Immigrant Border State.

Session Presenter: Valerie F. Hunt. faculty member in the bachelor’s degree program of Applied Behavioral Science at Seattle Central College.

In order to teach and develop curricula about immigrant and refugee issues, it is important to understand some of the structural, historical, political, and social contexts of immigration in general, and Washington State in particular. In this workshop, participants will examine Washington’s history as a border state and what it means to be a border state, especially compared to other U.S. border states.

We will also review key dimensions of immigration—labor market forces, state/society relationships, human and civil rights—and how these dimensions inform our perceptions and practices about issues such illegal immigration,  “anchor babies,” job and education funding competition between native-born and immigrant workers, and national identity. The workshop will provide participants with leading-edge, state-of-the-discipline concepts, themes, and language to use when developing their own immigration-focused curricula.

Additional Sessions:

  • Cultural Influences and Contributions of Immigrants
  • 2015 Community College Master Teaching Institute on Immigration and Refugees: Content and teaching applications.
  • Immigrants, refugees and undocumented students: Highlighting experiences and diversity on campus, in the classroom, and community.
  • Teaching Abroad: Best Practices and Options for Teaching Abroad
  • Integrating Global Perspectives into Teaching through NIEA mini grants.

The Workshop is especially significant in light of current conditions, and is sponsored by Northwest International Education Association (NIEA) and Center for Global Studies at University of Washington.  Registration is via the NIEA website www.nieawa.org, then send payment to Heather F. Lukashin as indicated on the form.

 

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